Why are New Muslims Leaving Islam?

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“I don’t know if you can help me; I don’t even know where to start. My life is a mess. I’ve been a Muslim for 5 years and each Ramadan instead of increasing in my emaan, I question whether I can continue living as a Muslim. The loneliness I have felt over the last 5 years is one I never felt before I became Muslim. I feel it even more in Ramadan. I receive so many emails about how to complete the Qu’ran in 30 days, how to attain taqwa but I just struggle trying to get through the days.

When I took my shahadah, so many sisters hugged me and gave me their phone numbers but after a few weeks, they didn’t respond to my calls or my messages. I’m so alone, it really hurts. They told me they would help me learn how to pray. I still don’t know how to pray. I’ve tried youtube and books but they don’t work.  I’m really struggling. I phoned my local masjid and they laughed at me after I told them how long I was Muslim and couldn’t pray. I’m so down and alone. I wish I could be like most and look forward to Ramadan. I wish I could read the Koran. I wish I could pray taraweeh. I wish I didn’t feel so alone. I have tried; I went to the masjid to break my fast. But nobody spoke to me. They offered me food and drink but then after praying they just ate in their little circles smiling and laughing. You’re my last attempt – can you help me? I’m desperate.”  Mandy

Sadly, the SOLACE team receive many emails like that of Mandy’s. There’s a sound proportion of revert sisters who receive support and they really work diligently with their SOLACE support workers to make positive change in their lives.  In contrast however, there are sisters like Mandy who disappear despite our willingness to support them. It is as though they are scared to receive support only to be let down for the umpteenth time. As a team, we can only pray and make du’aa that they will meet beautiful sincere Muslims who will help them as they should have been helped during those first few fragile weeks of being a very new Muslim.

The picture for most new reverts is indeed a very positive one. One needs only to attend a shahaadah ceremony and observe the mixture of excitement and nervousness sprawled across the face of the one taking that amazing step; crossing from the fields of kufr into the vastness of tawheed. It is such a joyous moment – both for the new Muslim and for those who are present, witnessing the guidance of Allah unfold in an individual’s life. Most faces are streaming with tears  as their hearts increase in faith in the One and Only Creator, Allah (Subhanahu wa ta’ala).

It is equally overwhelming for the new believer as she is swamped with hugs, kisses, books, hijabs and telephone numbers. There is a sense of a new immediate family, and the fear of what their own non-Muslim family will say and do is subdued by the hope that their new Muslim family will be there no matter what.

Quite tragically, the situation can at times be very different just as Mandy described in her email. More than likely, brothers and sisters that attend a shahaadah ceremony really do have a good intention to keep in touch. Certainly excuses must be made; perhaps they imagined that the new believer has a solid support network, after all, there were so many telephone numbers handed over that day.  Others may be busy in their own lives and feel pressurised with the responsibility of helping a new Muslim. Passing on a few books and CDs is sufficient but what if they needed somewhere to stay?

The sad reality is that too many brothers and sisters leave the responsibility to others assuming that there is enough support when in fact, the new Muslim has absolutely no one to support her. It is at this delicate time that she definitely needs support as the onset of tests pervade her life. It is as though upon uttering the testimony of faith, the new believer is tested to see whether they truly believe as Allah (Subhanahu wa ta’ala) says:

‘…We might test him who believes in the Hereafter from him who is in doubt concerning it: and the Lord watches over all things.’[1]

Had the new Muslim been supported, been shown how to pray, been taught the foundations of Islam and given a firm foundation, been put in touch with a good group of brothers or sisters that took them under their wings and looked after them; they would have had the tools and strength of faith to deal with the tests that face most new Muslims.

Unfortunately, due to a lack of the above at the crucial beginning of their Muslim life, the following types of issues arise which sadly often lead to someone like Mandy entering Islam with zeal and belief and leaving it weeks, months or years later with hatred and disbelief…

Rejection by family

A large number of new Muslims experience negative reactions from their non-Muslim relatives.  The experiences vary from being ignored, physically removed from the family home, and we have even received cases of others who were locked up and beaten by relatives. It is at this time that support from Muslims is crucially needed. However, many new Muslims endure these tests with their family with minimal support or understanding from members of the Muslim community. Often, the rejection and abuse received at the hands of family members is too much for some and they succumb to the pressure of leaving Islam feeling that they have no other alternative because all the brothers and sisters disappeared and hence there is no other alternative.

Choosing a wrong spouse

Many brothers and sisters feel that there is a simple quick fix for the new Muslim who has been abandoned by their own relatives: To get married and get married quickly! This is the case more so with female reverts than their male counterparts. The sister is struggling to learn Surah Al Fatihah and before she knows it, she is flooded with recommendations of pious brothers who are looking to get married, brothers who could help her on her path. She is given a good breakdown of what characteristics constitute a good Muslim husband; one who wears trousers above his ankles and observes a beard. Well-meaning sisters persuade the new Muslim to marry their own recommendation with choruses of ‘Trust me, my husband has known him for years – he’s a good practising brother!’ Regrettably, there is no mention of his character, likes and dislikes and the likelihood of compatibility. Two or three meetings are conducted by a wali (guardian) appointed at the last minute. The nikaah takes place in a small room within the masjid.  Non-Muslim relatives who have not abandoned their daughters, look on in dismay as their dreams of their daughter’s wedding is shattered. Or the new Muslim takes the next most important step in her life without the knowledge of her non-Muslim relatives.

Months down the line, still struggling to learn how to pray, she is either divorced or living a very miserable married life. Years down the line, we find that she has remarried four to five times in the same manner as more brothers and sisters pity her and persuade her into thinking that marriage will solve her problems. Children are born into this situation and live with a mother who is severely depressed with only one visible sign of Islam – her hijab.  It is only a matter of time before the last sign of Islam is removed and she seeks peace and tranquillity in her old lifestyle or religion.

This example may seem extreme to many but shockingly this is the reality for many new Muslims.

Moving towards an extreme version of Islam

Zeal and passion for Islam is evident in many new Muslims. Like sponges, they are eager to learn, absorb and implement. There seems to be a misconstrued silent rule that upon entering Islam, a complete rejection of everything that came before is required. With an ‘all or nothing’ mentality, she severs family ties as she cannot live her life surrounded by ‘kaafirs’.  Clothes are put into bin bags and phone numbers are changed. Within a few days, the new believer changes from wearing jeans to completely covering from head to toe in black. The new Muslim believes she is moving in the correct direction as she receives impressed compliments from other sisters. Shortly down the line, those initial strict immediate changes begin to show its cracks as she wonders why she feels no connection, deep faith or tranquility in her salaah. She wonders why her heart feels dead and why she now craves to go back to the life that she once led.

Confused, depressed and with only a speck of emaan left in her heart, she wonders what to do. She cannot return to her family whom she cut ties with. In addition to the strained relationships she has with other sisters and the sisterhood, the  marriage she is in which is full of constant arguments and depression – with all this, she makes an all or nothing choice again and leaves Islam altogether.

There are so many other issues that could be highlighted within this article. But the purpose of this article is not to depress the readers but to portray the other side of the New Muslim’s life which often goes unheard.

Ramadhan is a time where many reverts feel very alone. We know that the purpose of Ramadhan is not to socialise but rather it is to attain taqwa of Allah. However, we must try to view Ramadhan from the perspective of a new believer. Coming from a very non-Muslim sociable lifestyle, there are very few chances to really socialise. Ramadhan is seen by many reverts as a time to be with others, to share, eat and grow together. When this is not present, stark truths are deeply felt and the new Muslim begins to realise them; the family they lost upon entering Islam, their lack of Muslim friends and as a result, the huge social void in their lives begins to emerge.

Fasting those first few times without much needed encouragement to make it until iftar is a huge mountain to climb and so many new Muslims give up and break their fasts intentionally. This results in them living the rest of Ramadhan truly believing that they will never be forgiven, that Allah (Subhanahu wa ta’ala) hates them and that they are destined for the hellfire.

Observing large extended families coming together, enjoying iftar, attending taraweeh prayer together and preparing for the equivalent of Christmas, Eid Al Fitr, is quite a depressing time as they realise yet again that they are all alone.

Eid is the most dreaded time of the year. Since they are no longer attending family functions such as weddings, birthday parties, and religious festivities, they hope that Eid would be a joyous occasion to share with others. However, some deliberately choose not to leave their homes on Eid, unable to witness everyone else’s happiness at the Eid salaah knowing that they will be returning home alone.

How can brothers and sisters make a difference this Ramadhan and Eid? More importantly, how can brothers and sisters support reverts throughout the whole year so that the rate of apostasy is widely reduced? Here are some tips that we hope every reader will try to implement with at least one revert whom they know:
  • Invite a revert around for iftar. Call them and ask after them. Do not assume that they are fine or even fasting. It doesn’t matter how long they have been Muslim. Really show that you care about them.
  • Give a gift to a revert this Eid. It will build the love between you both and can have a lasting effect in their perception of Muslims at a time when they might be going through a difficult time.
  • Share a part of your Eid day with a revert; even if it is just for one hour. Really go out of your way to make it a special time for them.
  • Besides Ramadhan and Eid, one of the most important ways you can help a revert is to help them build a very solid foundation in their deen. Bring them closer to Allah and help them develop a strong relationship with their Creator. This step is probably the most crucial as it marks the difference in how they deal with the various tests that will come their way.
  • Do not look at a revert in terms of how long they have been Muslim. Remember that they spent twenty, thirty or even forty years with certain thoughts, and practices that were completely alien to Islam. The psychological transition into a completely different way of life can take years.
  • Dedicate yourself to really helping at least one revert Muslim for life – help them learn how to pray, share good and difficult times together, attend lectures together – seek knowledge together. Commit yourself to helping them for life.

Update:


MESSAGE FROM UMM RAIYAAN (copied from comments section below)
ssalamuu alaykum,

As a SOLACE team we are grateful to Allah (Swt) first and foremost for the opportunity to create awareness about the difficulties reverts face. islam21c.com has been an amazing platform to further this type of awareness and we would also like to thank islam21.com for offering us the chance to contribute towards their articles.There are several organisations that support very new Muslims and try to help them during the crucial initial weeks and months. However, there is a huge number of reverts, some of whom who have been Muslim for 10+ years, who no longer seem to be labelled as a new Muslim who need just as much if not more support. For SOLACE, it is those who do not fall into the wonderful hands of organisations such as iERA and others that we tend to support.Sadly, to date we have received 80+ requests of help this year alone.If you would like to support SOLACE – you can do so through the following methods:

1. By forwarding this article as much as possible.
2. By joining our mailing list at www.solaceuk.org and forwarding campaign alerts, testimonials etc in a bid to also increase awareness.
3. Volunteer your time to work with SOLACE
4. Donate – we are solely funded by the kind donations by brothers and sisters.
5. We are definitely looking to expand nationwide and internationally due to a large number of outside London cases.As we are a grassroots organisation, we are constantly working at the ‘front line’ directly with service users and so our work really does never stop.

JazakhaAllahu khairan for your help,
On behalf of all of the SOLACE team,
Wasalamu alaykum
Umm Raiyaan
Director of SOLACE

Finding a spouse, maintaining strong marriages- Video

http://seekershub.org/blog/2015/02/video-finding-a-spouse-maintaining-strong-marriages/

It isn’t easy finding the right spouse and maintaining a loving, peaceful, and long-lasting relationship. In this engaging seminar, Shaykh Faraz Rabbani and Ustadha Shireen Ahmed share practical knowledge and real life scenarios on:

Seekers hub Toronto - Marriage Seminar– Choosing a spouse.
– Involving your family appropriately.
– Understanding the marriage contract.
– The overall spiritual nature of marriage.
– The qualities required to maintain a healthy marriage.

SeekersHub Toronto  is a unique learning foundation that connects transformative knowledge and spirituality with actionable community service and social engagement. It is open and welcoming to individuals of all ages, religious beliefs, and walks of life–with equally diverse programs and activities offered at no cost.

Consider joining a class with SeekersHub Toronto. All classes are FREE.

Help us continue to provide Knowledge Without Barriers through your ongoing monthly support or a one-time donation.

Quotes of the day

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If an unlimited bounty should offer kingdoms,
If a buried treasure should grant me gems . . .
I would bow my soul low, lay my face in the dust
And plead: ‘Grant me instead, the Love of God!’
~Rumi

—–

Those devoted to the path of the ‘knowledge of God’s realisation’ (Irfaan ) have nothing to speak of except God.

~Khwaja Moinuddin Chishti

—–

“Don’t be arrogant with knowledge. A little bit of learning is a dangerous thing.
Drink deep, because shallow drinks intoxicate the brain.”

Imam Ghazali

—–

“Man is either your brother in faith or your equal in humanity.” – Imam Ali ibn Abi Talib

—–

In a Hasan/good Hadith, related by Imam Bukhari in his book on manners = al-Adab al-Mufrad. There is from Iyad ibn Khalifa that he heard ‘Ali, Karam’Allahu Wajhahu, say at Siffin,

“The intellect is located in the heart. Mercy is located in the liver, Compassion is located in the spleen. The self (nafs) is located in the lungs.”
حَدَّثَنَا سَعِيدُ بْنُ أَبِي مَرْيَمَ، قَالَ: أَخْبَرَنَا مُحَمَّدُ بْنُ مُسْلِمٍ قَالَ: أَخْبَرَنِي عَمْرُو بْنُ دِينَارٍ، عَنِ ابْنِ شِهَابٍ، عَنْ عِيَاضِ بْنِ خَلِيفَةَ، عَنْ عَلِيٍّ رَضِيَ اللَّهُ عَنْهُ، أَنَّهُ سَمِعَهُ بِصِفِّينَ يَقُولُ: إِنَّ الْعَقْلَ فِي الْقَلْبِ، وَالرَّحْمَةَ فِي الْكَبِدِ، وَالرَّأْفَةَ فِي الطِّحَالِ، وَالنَّفَسَ فِي الرِّئَةِ.

{Section ~ Illness and Visiting Those Who are Ill ~ 250 #547 ~ The intellect is located in the heart}

—–

Actions are lifeless forms, but the presence of an inner reality of sincerity within them is what endows them with life-giving Spirit.
Ibn Ata’illah

—–

“Don’t be dead or asleep or awake.
Don’t be anything.
What you most want,
what you travel around wishing to find,
lose yourself as lovers lose themselves,
and you’ll be that.”
―Attar

—–

The home we seek is in eternity;
The Truth we seek is like a shoreless sea,
Of which your paradise is but a drop.
This ocean can be yours; why should you stop
Beguiled by dreams of evanescent dew?
The secrets of the sun are yours, but you
Content yourself with motes trapped in its beams.
Turn to what truly lives, reject what seems —
Which matters more, the body or the soul?
Be whole: desire and journey to the Whole.

Shaykh Farid ud-Din Attar

—–

“Love Is The Cure,
for your pain will keep giving birth to more pain
until your eyes constantly exhale love as effortlessly as your body yields its scent.”
~Rumi

—–

”The knower of secrets, the key to Sainthood, the helper of the needy, the King of the friends of Allah, the one who uttered ”My foot is on the neck of every Wali (Saint).”

Sultan al-Awliyah Shaykh Abdul Qadir al-Jilani

Mohammad SAW A mercy to the world (Event)

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“And We have not sent you, O Muhammad, except as a mercy to the worlds.” (Surah Al-Anbiya 21:107)

We are delighted to invite you to a collaborative conference with other local Islamic organizations, honoring the life and character of our beloved Prophet, peace and blessings be upon him.
Join us this Sunday, February 22nd, 3pm-8pm, at the Minneapolis Convention Center. This is an ideal learning opportunity exploring the exemplary nature of our Prophet (saw) and why he was a mercy for ALL mankind – it’s not just for Muslims, so be sure to invite your friends and neighbors of other faiths to this FREE event.

Valentines Day Gone Wrong

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Love being misunderstood

Love is a word that is commonly uttered and heard in our societies. In fact, every person is in need and search of a true love, but every person has a different opinions and views about this issue. It is clear from Islamic teachings that Islam itself is the religion of love and brotherhood. It urges its followers to live in loveable and brotherhood atmosphere. But unfortunately, what is love in Islam, is defined wrongly in our societies and communities, which results in many shameful and sinful events. Due to such events even those who know the true love are double minded in expressing their love, whereas the teachings of Islam exhort us to inform our brother if we love him.
Love in Islam & other beliefs

Islam defined love and specified all its ways of fulfillment. It is due to our ignorance and negligence of the Islamic teachings that created such miserable situation and that a baseless and shameful tradition like Valentines Day took place. Non-Muslims celebrate this tradition on 14th February every year in order to fulfill their sinful desires and lusts.

In this day and age, this custom become well-known and vastly celebrated even in Muslim countries. People present valentine day flowers and valentine day gifts to their loved ones on this event. They blindly follow the ways of non-Muslim and even do not know what is valentine day history and the reality of this tradition is and why it is celebrated?
Continue reading “Valentines Day Gone Wrong”

Seeking nearness to Allah, the ultimate aim in our worldly work

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“Therefore, when you wish to go to your market or do something for your livelihood, or take up a craft or become an agent (wakālah) or engage in some other vocations in order to seek the licit and to imitate the practice of Allāh’s Messenger—Allāh bless him and grant him peace—and to seek recompense (thawāb) for yourself and your dependents, to earn provision for them, and in order to be independent of people while showing compassion to brethren and neighbours, and to pay the obligatory alms and discharge every obligatory right, then hold out hope through these efforts that you shall meet Allāh—glorified and exalted be He—while your countenance is as the moon on the night when it is full.”

Imam Al-Hārith ibn Asad Al-Muhāsibī in his Kitab al-Makasib wa al-Wara’

Resources for Seekers:
What Does it Mean to Have “Beautiful Restraint and Balance” in one’s Work, Career, and in Seeking one’s Provision?
Are There Any Invocations To Help Me Find A Job?
Trust in Allah and Provisions for Seekers of Knowledge
Is There a Prayer I Can Make So That My Co-Workers Will Cooperate and Work Better With Me?

We often forget that scholars are just human beings who happen to be experts in their fields.

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We often forget that scholars are just human beings who happen to be experts in their fields. Why are they considered experts? Like any position they are considered the experts because they have put in time, effort and through action have shown that they are sincere about the pursuit of truth. For me the character of a Scholar is far more important than what he actually knows. The reason is that I know an individual who has proven to have the best of character is going to be as honest as possible in his approach to learning and sharing knowledge.

Scholar is not synonymous with perfect.

They make mistakes and May Allah reward them for them because of their sincerity.

Side Note: this does not mean we blindly follow the mistake. This means that if they make a mistake we reject it and take what is correct.

20 mins

sister Lacey Tourney’s Journey To Islam

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Lacey Tourney, 22 years-old and formerly of Catholic faith
always felt a spiritual disconnection which led to a curiosity to explore the cultural horizons.

“I knew faith was important and I wanted to have a faith base in my life but I wasn’t happy,” she said.

She enrolled in a Middle Eastern religious studies course at the University of Regina and began delving into the practices of Islam.

Not long after she converted to Islam.

“Going to university, I met a lot of individuals that were Muslim. We would sit and talk for hours and they would tell me about their culture and way of life. I just thought: ‘This all makes a lot of sense, something just clicked. Islam just seemed to mesh a lot more in what I believe in,’ ” said Tourney.

Since the conversion, the fourth-year arts education student has made life changes. In December, she decided to wear the hijab, which is a cloth that covers the hair, neck and chest from the public eye.

“I wanted everything to be gradual because it’s a lifestyle change that (affects) your everyday actions,” she said. “Being a convert, you need to find the reasoning behind everything. And the reasoning behind Muslim faith is to make your life more healthy, more fulfilling (and) to make you care more about other people and concentrate on helping them.”

This time of year is significant for the Muslim community, as the tradition of Ramadan – eating little food and drinking no water – is carried out.

It will be Tourney’s third year participating in the special occasion.

The 22-year-old will “break the fast” each evening at sundown and partake in a joyous gathering that takes place at friend’s and family homes.

Debra Schubert, a close friend of Tourney’s who also converted to Islam in 2002 said, “Lacey put on the hijab as a testimony of faith.”

There are five pillars of faith in Islam, said Schubert, including testimony of faith, prayer, fasting, a pilgrimage to Mecca and charity.

Ramadan is a way of purifying the mind and spirit, while gaining compassion for those who are less fortunate, said Schubert. Each evening there is prayer, accompanied with eating small amounts of dates and drinking water.

“You’re going to feel a heightened sense of emotions and awareness, you notice things about others you normally wouldn’t,” she said. “In other parts of the world, others do not have the luxury of eating in the evening during Ramadan. It really puts things into perspective. It’s intense.”

Tourney hopes to teach at the Regina Huda School after convocation next spring. “She’s just a fun-loving person,” said Schubert. “Everything in this religion is between yourself and your Creator. (Lacey) is able to be herself but now she also prays and wears hijab.”

Allahu Akbar. Allahu Akbar. Allahu Akbar.

Brother Jamal Omar

Allahu Akbar. Allahu Akbar. Allahu Akbar.
“I was the only one in my family that had accepted Islam. Alhamdulillah, my sister Sandra Jd Mears found me, and now her and her husband and 5 year old daughter have accepted Islam.

Allah is very kind and has given me more than I could of ever asked for. Please make dua for them as they are the only Muslims in this small town. Also make dua for the rest of my family that they follow the same path, insha Allah.”

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If any Christians, Jews, or any non-Muslims wish to have a friendly dialogue or debate about Islam, feel free to message me

If any Christians, Jews, or any non-Muslims wish to have a friendly dialogue or debate about Islam, feel free to message me on this page. Or contact me on my website. The same goes for any supporters of the so-called “Islamic State,” a term I use reluctantly, who want to have a dialogue on whether they are a legitimate khilafah. Please note that this is a FRIENDLY debate. No throwing around curse words or hateful rhetoric. Contact me on my website:

http://www.TareqMcDonald.com

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Message from new Muslim on the video ‘How to exit the Matrix’?

Message from new Muslim on the video ‘How to exit the Matrix’:

Sent it to my son who is struggling with meaning of life and loves the matrix movies. I converted 2 years ago, Alhamdulilah. My (adult) children supported my decision although they are not believers. I pray one day they,too, will exit the matrix like I did. It was the best decision I ever made. Jazaka’Allah Khair for this great video and your dawah.

Please watch and share this brilliant video.

Here’s the story regarding David’s shahadah

Last week on Saturday David was busy selling the ‘Big Issue’ magazine in the city. He was stationed near our dawah stand. He became curious about Islam and muslims. We initiated the conversation asking questions such as: do you know your purpose in life, what happens after death, the difference between a muslim and a disbeliever in terms of attitude and lifestyle, why Islam is being demonised in the media, why it’s important to die as a muslim, the laws of Allah vs the laws of whims/desires, how to gain the pleasure of Allah in this world as well as the next, how to be proactive and take the shahada now before it’s too late and the five pillars of Islam.
After about half an hour David still didn’t feel this was for him so he took the Quran and some additional information on Islam and left.
A week later we met him again today at the same place. This time he was in a happy mood and surprisingly He greeted us with his salaams. He said he started to read the Quran.
It was time to pray Dhuhr so a brother called the adhan. David was mesmerised by the adhan, later he had to go back to work. After we completed the salah, David came back and said he wanted to join us in salah.
From there I sensed a ‘shahada signal’ and then asked David to take the shahada. He took the shahada quite comfortably alhamdulillah.

Dawahmatrix
Yesterday at 5:35pm · Edited ·

It’s worth it to ask yourself how much of the suffering in your life is a result of your choices.

It’s worth it to ask yourself how much of the suffering in your life is a result of your choices.

Are you choosing to not stand up for yourself?

Not wanting to rock the boat and therefore silently suffering?

Refusing to believe the truth, and holding on to a smothering dream?

Focusing on what you don’t have instead of what you do have?

Investing more energy in holding it all in rather than reaching out
for help?

These aren’t questions I’m putting out there as judgments – they are questions, actually, that I can say I’ve had to answer for myself, and make changes when I answered them!

As the famous saying goes, pain is inevitable, but suffering is optional.

Angel, Ex-Christian, USA

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A Personal Account Of A Revert Muslim:
From a broken family and society, a woman finds support from some Muslim friends.

Every Muslim has a story about their journey to Islam. Each one is interesting and curious to me. God truly guides who He wants and only who He wants. I feel so blessed to have been one of the chosen. Here is my story.

I always believed in One God. My entire life during hardship, I asked God for help even as a child. I remember crying on my knees in the kitchen, screaming and crying all around me. I was praying for God to make it stop. Religion on the other hand never did make sense. The older I got, the less it really made sense to me. People thinking they were the negotiator between you and God. Continue reading “Angel, Ex-Christian, USA”